Dektonclay: When Industry Meets Artisan

Dektonclay, a project by Xavier Mañosa of Apparatu, cleverly explores an artisan’;s manipulation of Dekton®, an ultracompact surface material by Cosentino.










‘Goliath’;

The Spanish, family-owned Cosentino Group is a global concern, whose property portfolio includes: 6 factories, fifteen kitchen and bathroom surface production centres, and over ninety Cosentino centres worldwide. Cosentino makes and distributes high-end innovative surfaces for the world of design and architecture. With a resolute commitment to research and development, the company produces several technologically-advanced surfaces, utilised in the creation of spaces and distinctive designs for the home and public domains. One such surface is Dekton®, a sophisticated blend of inorganic raw materials used in the production of glass, the latest porcelain tiles and quartz surfaces.

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In Almeria, Spain, Cosentino’;s industrial park and headquarters has a total surface area of almost one million square metres. Image © Cosentino S.A.

Where natural stone undergoes metamorphic changes over thousands of years, exposed to high pressure and high temperatures, Dekton replicates this process in a highly accelerated form. Consequently, this superior and ultracompact surface material has unlimited design and manufacturing applications.

‘David’;

On the outskirts of Barcelona, the family-owned Apparatu is a Spanish pottery workshop, atelier and design studio with a difference. Founded by the accomplished ceramicist Xavier Mañosa, Apparatu deftly balances and blends traditional ceramic craft with modern-day research and innovation.



The Apparatu workshop. Image courtesy of Apparatu.


The Apparatu workshop. Image courtesy of Apparatu.

Dektonclay

In a modern-day twist to the traditional ‘David and Goliath’; story, Xavier Mañosa of Apparatu worked with Cosentino to produce Dektonclay, a project exploring the versatility of Dekton. Here, an industrialised product was manipulated by the hands of an artisan. Over a period of 3 years, Mañosa worked with Dekton to create a collection of tableware, kitchenware, furniture pieces and a kitchen itself.




Dektonclay. Image © Cosentino S.A.


Dektonclay. Image courtesy of Apparatu.


Dektonclay. Image © Cosentino S.A.

Xavier Mañosa was enticed by the idea of using only one material across the entire project: he manipulated Dekton to produce everything from ovens to handles. A gifted potter, Mañosa worked with Dekton to test the material’;s performance under different temperatures, ascertaining just how malleable Dekton could be, and seeking other ways in which the surface material might be used.

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Xavier Mañosa. Image © Cosentino S.A.

Available in a number of colours, Mañosa chose Dekton’;s Spectra XGloss hue: with an exquisite, glossy black finish, the effect is visually appealing and powerful. Indeed, through Dektonclay, Xavier Mañosa has achieved a project of visual merit, the result one that is original, engaging and aesthetically pleasing.



Dektonclay. Image © Cosentino S.A.


Dektonclay. Image © Cosentino S.A.


Dektonclay. Image courtesy of Apparatu.


Dektonclay. Image courtesy of Apparatu.

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