England’s Post War Listed Buildings

A month or so ago we received a veritable tome of a book in the post. The stunning England’s Post War Listed Buildings By Elain Harwood & James O. Davies, is a comprehensive and stylish guide to over 650 of most exceptional buildings, monuments and landscapes listed for protection. Post War architecture really has divided people, with some seeing it as an absolute abomination. We don’t think so- although there are some intriguing buildings in the book!

post war listed

Severals, Runcton Lane, Runcton

Humble prefabs, high-rise flats and telephone boxes rub shoulders with cathedrals, concert halls, and even country houses. The book shows how dynamic English architecture was in the years after 1945, when new thinking on architecture and social welfare transformed cities and countryside.

church post war

Since the first edition of Harwood’s Guide to Post-War Listed Buildings in 2000 the number of entries has doubled, and 200 more buildings have been added since the second edition. All the entries have been fully revised and James O. Davies has visited every building, and the book features his stunning new photography.


St Paul’s Church, Lorrimore Square

St Paul’s Church, Lorrimore Square

Throughout the era, some architects remained true to classical traditions, but many more explored the exciting possibilities of steel and concrete, creating ‘op’ icons as Centre Point or dramatic examples of Brutalism like Preston Bus Station. New entries range from the Casbah Club, home of the early Beatles, to Richard Rogers’s Lloyd’s Building in London, all arranged by region and within that by date.

22 Parkside, Wimbledon, Richard & Su Rogers

22 Parkside, Wimbledon, Richard & Su Rogers

We have to admit this colourful house by famed architect Richard Rogers who still lives there by all accounts, is one of our favourites from the book.